Wednesday, September 17, 2008

So... who ya votin' for??

Just kidding. I don't wanna get into that here. I'm too big of chicken. I don't like mean people visiting my blog telling me how to vote. So... I did just want to pass along this info. Chel sent me an email the other day and my sister posted it as well. I wanted to pass it along to anyone who didn't know this and to those who do, but need a reminder. Here's most of the email I received.

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Remember, it was not until 1920 that women were granted the right to go to the polls and vote.
The women were innocent and defenseless, but they were jailed nonetheless for picketing the White House, carrying signs asking for the vote. And by the end of the night, they were barely alive. Forty prison guards wielding clubs and their warden's blessing went on a rampage against the 33 women wrongly convicted of 'obstructing sidewalk traffic.'

(Lucy Burns)
They beat Lucy Burns, chained her hands to the cell bars above
her head and left her hanging for the night, bleeding and gasping
for air.
(Dora Lewis)
They hurled Dora Lewis into a dark cell, smashed her head against an iron bed and knocked her out cold. Her cellmate, Alice Cosu, thought Lewis was dead and suffered a heart attack. Additional affidavits describe the guards grabbing, dragging, beating, choking, slamming, pinching, twisting and kicking the women.
Thus unfolded the 'Night of Terror' on Nov. 15, 1917, when the warden at the Occoquan Workhouse in Virginia ordered his guards to teach a lesson to the suffragists imprisoned there because they dared to picket Woodrow Wilson's White House for the right to vote. For weeks, the women's only water came from an open pail. Their food--all of it colorless slop--was infested with worms.

(Alice Paul)
When one of the leaders, Alice Paul, embarked on a hunger strike, they tied her to a chair, forced a tube down her throat and poured liquid into her until she vomited. She was tortured like this for weeks until word was smuggled out to the press. You can read more here.
Woodrow Wilson and his cronies tried to persuade a psychiatrist to declare Alice Paul insane so that she could be permanently institutionalized. And it is inspiring that the doctor refused. Alice Paul was strong, he said, and brave. That didn't make her crazy.
The doctor admonished the men: 'Courage in women is often mistaken for insanity.'
Please, if you are so inclined, pass this on to all the women you know. And VOTE this year!!
We need to get out and vote and use this right that was fought so hard for by these very courageous women. Whether you vote democratic, republican or independent party - remember to vote. Even if you aren't LOVING any of the candidates- write someone in.
History is being made.

9 comments:

The New Mrs. Rue said...

Thanks for the post. It's so important to remember the people that paved the way for the way we live today. I kinda stole your post for today, but come on over and check it out b/c it's a part of "Wordless Wednesday With A Twist" at theamericanmum dot blogspot dot com!!

~Christy~

Millie said...

I had no idea the suffragettes were treated so awfully. Yikes. They don't tell you that in that little Schoolhouse Rock song. Or in Mary Poppins.

I feel so lied to. ;)

Thanks for this - it's important.

Millie said...

P.S. I gave you an award. :)

carrie said...

Wow I had no idea what those women suffered so we could vote. Now I am grateful I haven't taken for granted my right to vote. I have voted at every Presidential election since I was 18.

glittersmama said...

I love Mary Poppins.

I didn't know all of that either. Thanks for sharing.

aubrey said...

what a great email/post. thanks for sharing this tori! i would be honored to be categorized as insane. and i love mary poppins!! too bad the mom is an airhead in it, though. kind of sheds a bad light on women's movement. haha.

Klin said...

I am a big fan of voting.

This is a great post and a good reminder.

You got an award from Millie?! You lucky girl.

Virginia Harris said...

Hi Tori,

Let’s Hear It for the Ladies Who Brought Us the 19th Amendment and the Women’s Vote!

Senator Clinton and Governor Palin are proof that women can and do diverge on important issues.

Even on the question of whether women should vote!

Most people are totally in the dark about HOW the suffragettes won votes for women, and what life was REALLY like for women before they did.

Suffragettes were opposed by many women who were what was known as ‘anti.’ The most influential ‘anti’ lived in the White House — First Lady Edith Wilson!

I’d like to share a women’s history learning opportunity…

“The Privilege of Voting” is a new free e-mail series that follows eight great women from 1912 - 1920 to reveal ALL that happened to set the stage for women to finally win the vote.

It’s a real-life soap opera about the suffragettes! And it’s ALL true!

Powerful suffragettes Alice Paul and Emmeline Pankhurst are featured, along with TWO gorgeous presidential mistresses, First Lady Edith Wilson, Edith Wharton, Isadora Duncan and Alice Roosevelt.

There are tons of heartache on the rocky road to the ballot box, but in the end, women WIN!

Exciting, sequential episodes with lots of historical photos are great to read on coffeebreaks, or anytime.

Thanks to the success of the suffragettes, women have voices and choices!

I hope you will subscribe, and share this opportunity with others.

It’s free at

http://www.CoffeebreakReaders.com/subscribe.html

JustRandi said...

My mom can remember her grandma talking about being a suffragette. I don't think it was quite so dangerous for her, though.
Either way, it's important to vote!